Monthly Archives: March 2014

A Herd of Key Deer

The antlers in this herd of 14 are in different stages. Some have already fallen off. One deer was  rubbing his stack against a wood stump, trying to release it (photo#3). Another male is in the process of growing a new set and the velvet covering the growth is visible (photo#8). The more I get […]

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Key Deer

Watching this herd of Key Deer down the block from my house is an incredible gift I feel bestowed upon me. Each moment is precious as I see the animals interacting with each other. I am amazed to witness two males grooming each other. I am still amazed even after living on this island for […]

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In The Rain

These baby Anhingas are the same ones I photographed on February 23rd. They have grown rapidly and are nearly the size of their parents. There was a total of five nests within feet of each other. The alligator was in a hurry to cross the road to get into the canal and out of the […]

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Where is the baby Osprey?

The mother seems to be wondering the same thing. The baby is too young to fly off and if it did it would still be nearby. Did something happen to it while both parents went fishing? It was not in the nest as I am always able to hear it and today it was silent. I […]

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Key Deer On The Beach

The yearling was getting scolded by his mother. She did not want him eating the plastic and actually lifted her leg several times striking him, trying to get him to move away and follow her into the woods. Just like horses, the key deer express a variety of emotions through their ear movements. Laid back […]

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DO NOT FEED the Key Deer

I have discovered that someone is feeding the Key Deer right down the street from me, attracting the herd of nine I saw yesterday.Then again today I saw four bucks eating pellets the humans gave them. Haven’t the people lived here long enough to realize that feeding the deer is harmful for them? It keeps […]

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Muscovy Ducks

These tropical ducks has been bred since pre-Columbian times by Native Americans. They are native to Mexico and South America, and somehow found their way to Big Pine Key.

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